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Achilles Tendinopathy

The Achilles is the largest and thickest tendon in the body. It is made up of Type 1 collagen fibres, tenocytes, and proteoglycans which are responsible for the tendon’s tensile strength. These complex interwoven fibres merge from the calf muscles, gastrocnemius and soleus to form the tendon that inserts into the heel bone, the calcaneus. The Achilles is involved in 93% of the plantar force in flexion of the foot. When healthy, this tendon can handle up to nine times the body weight and has a pivotal function in transmitting forces, such as explosive power and control of movements.

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Adductor strains in the sporting population

Groin strains are commonly seen in sports with multi-directional and high velocity demands such as hockey and soccer. As a result, large sporting bodies have published preventative rehabilitation guidelines which are incorporated in pre-game warmups around the world to mitigate strain risk and reduce recurrence rates.

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Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rehabilitation

Where Are We Now?

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) rupture has occupied a large portion of elite and amateur sporting injuries for decades. Discourse amongst the general population continues to support immediate surgical reconstruction followed by a lengthy return to sport timeframe. Thus, management of either surgical or conservative ACL ruptures necessitates robust rehabilitation protocols and a barrage of objective measures to meet the low return to sport levels and high recurrence rates.

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Parkrun physio package newcastle nsw

I came to run:

An evaluation of running biomechanics, strengthening programs and injury management

With the year that was, training has needed to be more versatile than ever. With the infrequent access to group fitness classes and gyms, there has been a significant increase in the number of people commencing running or incorporating it into their training regime. There are many factors to consider when getting into this often-addictive sport; how far, how often, how quickly, where and with what shoes. This article aims to present the most important factors to consider on this journey to mitigate injury risk and provide some confidence to make running a lasting activity!

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physiotherapy treatment rehab knee injuries ACL meniscus

Knee Pain? Here’s How Physios Treat Common Knee Complaints

The knee is the largest joint in the body, comprising the junction where the thigh bone (femur) meets with the shin (tibia and fibula) and the knee cap (patella). It is classified as a ‘hinge joint’, meaning its predominant movements are bending and straightening, although there is a small amount of rotation that occurs in the joint as well.

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Ankle sprain physio treatment physiotherapy recovery

Treating Ankle Sprains: Why Physio is Critical

Ankle sprains are undoubtedly one of the most common injuries we see as physiotherapists. The vast majority of active people will have experienced an ankle sprain during their lifetime and, unfortunately, sprains have a nasty habit of recurring if not managed well in the first instance.

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Shoulder injury rehabilitation physiotherapy Newcastle NSW

Five Common Shoulder Injuries and How to Treat Them

The shoulder is an especially complex area of the body, anatomically speaking, and unfortunately that means there are many potential areas for injury. The shoulder joint encompasses the junction where the upper arm bone (humerus) meets the collar bone (clavicle) and the shoulder blade (scapula) at the back.

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